The Museum – Maker Space Challenges

http://www.themuseum.ca/experience/underground-studio/education/

Students will learn by doing through experimentation, exploration and by ‘failing’ forward in unique 75 minute workshops delivered in our one-of-a-kind MakerSpace. Take part in projects across one of seven core program streams: 3D Modeling, Computer Programming, Circuitry & Soldering, Woodworking, Screenprinting, Textiles, or Deconstruction. Each program is linked to Ontario Curriculum expectations with an emphasis on inquiry-based learning and developing critical thinking skills.

It All Starts Here.

AGAINST THE GRAIN – WOODWORKING

Through proper use of hand and power tools for woodworking, students will cut, drill and fasten materials to measured specifications for the design of a tool box.

CONDUCTION JUNCTION – CIRCUITRY AND SOLDERING

Students will create digital circuits that carry out a specific task while considering electrical principles such as voltage, current and resistance. Students will complete the workshop by soldering a circuit together as a take home badge.

DESTINATION DISASSEMBLY – DECONSTRUCTION

Students will learn about the engineering design process to consider a simple challenge by deconstructing found objects using tools and methods provided. They will then be tasked with assembling a unique object that fulfills an imagined function.

HELLO, MR. ROBOT – COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (1-6)

Introduce your students to computer programming in a visual environment using the Scratch platform. Interpret how different logical statements change how a system behaves and experiment with different sensory commands to see what programs are capable of doing.

HELLO, MR. ROBOT – COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (7-12)

Challenge your students to create a program using the Arduino platform that causes lights to blink. Students will learn about the relationship between hardware and software by wiring systems together. Finally, students will decode a message in ASCII with the help from our robot Nali!

PLOT, BLOT, AND TWO STITCHING STYLES – SCREEN PRINTING AND TEXTILES

Using traditional screen printing methods, students will create and cut a custom design from heat transfer vinyl and transfer their design onto fabric.

 

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The Museum – Theme Weeks

S.T.E.M: DESTINATION IMAGINATION

November 6 – November 10, 2017
Challenge your students to a day of interactive S.T.E.M activities and workshops. Make, tinker, build, and connect with professionals from Waterloo Region’s tech sector to showcase the potential of pursuing S.T.E.M based careers!

It all starts here.

ABORIGINAL INTERSECTIONS – Social Studies

March 26 – March 29, 2018
Stories unite us. They come from traditions of the wampum weavers and oral storytellers sharing tales of Turtle Island. But they are also being explored by emerging Aboriginal artists. Students have a unique opportunity to learn about storytelling, traditions, and the rich culture of Canadian First Nations communities.

MEDIEVAL WEEK – Grade 4 Social Studies

April 30 – May 3, 2018
Hear ye! Hear ye! Students will be immersed in unique hands-on medieval activities and workshops as we travel back to medieval times. Students will participate in a variety of workshops to experience the challenges, intrigue and excitement of living during Medieval times – all led by in-character facilitators!

 

Get the Math – Math Challenges

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The Challenges

Get the Math Challenges

meet-the-teams

 

The Setup

This video introduces professionals who will pose real-world math challenges to the teams.

Math in Music: Introduction

DobleFlo talks about using math in music production and presents an algebra challenge related to one of their new singles.

Math in Music: Take the challenge

Match the electronic beat to the instrumental sample by calculating the correct tempo in beats per minute.

Math in Music: Try other music challenges

Choose from different instrumental samples and electronic drum tracks to create a new track and figure out the correct tempo in beats per minute.

Math in Fashion: Introduction

Chloe Dao explains how she uses math as a fashion designer and sets up a math challenge involving one of her designs.

Math in Fashion: Take the challenge

Modify Chloe Dao’s design from the video to meet the target retail price of $35 or less.

Math in Fashion: Try other fashion challenges

After solving Chloe’s challenge, use the same skills to modify three more complicated garment designs.

Math in Videogames: Introduction

Julia Detar describes how she uses math to create videogames and presents a math challenge.

Math in Videogames: Take the challenge

Plot a linear path for the spaceship to avoid crashing into the asteroid.

Math in Videogames: Try other videogame challenges

After saving the spaceship, try a more challenging submarine game to test your skills with coordinate graphing and linear equations.

Introduction

Chef Sue Torres challenges the teams to use algebra to recommend a price for guacamole.

Math in Restaurants: Take the challenge

Choose one of two strategies to make your prediction for avocado prices in the coming year. Then, use Sue’s rule of thumb to come up with a recommended menu price for guacamole.

Math in Restaurants: Try other restaurant challenges

After solving Sue’s guacamole challenge, try additional challenges involving three menu items with different main ingredients: chicken, shrimp, and beef.

Math in Basketball: Introduction

Basketball player Elton Brand presents a challenge about the math behind free throw shots.

Math in Basketball: Take the challenge

Use the three key variables and Elton Brand’s stats to figure out the maximum height the basketball reaches when Elton shoots a free throw.

Math in Basketball: Try other basketball challenges

Choose new sets of stats and sharpen your skills with additional challenges around the math behind free throw shooting.

Math in Special Effects: Introduction

Jeremy Chernick from J&M Special Effects sets up a challenge about lighting for high-speed effects.

Math in Special Effects: Take the challenge

Use light probe readings to figure out the mathematical relationship between intensity and distance.

Math in Special Effects: Try other special effects challenges

Learn how a setting called an f-stop affects the amount of light coming through a camera lens.

640+ Ontario schools failed lead tests

Ontario is recognized as a North American leader for ensuring kids have safe water to drink but some schools have been found to have lead concentrations in water higher than the province’s threshold. Only 5 per cent of all facilities that submitted water lead tests between April 2016 and March 2017 failed to meet the provincial standard, and the province says that “flushing” taps by regularly letting the water run has in many cases effectively reduced concentrations.

While the ministry says flushing has been shown to reduce lead levels, Lanphear said it isn’t a long-term solution.

“Even if you flush it and it goes down it can build up within about 30 minutes back up to the pre-flushed levels and we can’t expect the maintenance guys at the schools to walk around and flush these things before every class break ,” he said, adding that installing certified filters would be a slightly better short-term solution.

There is also no such thing as a safe level of lead exposure, health bodies like the World Health Organization and American Academy of Pediatrics agree.

Young children can absorb four to five times more ingested lead than adults, according to the World Health Organization, which also notes that at lower levels of lead exposure, which were previously considered safe, lead can affect children’s brain development and result in lower IQ scores — effects that are thought to be irreversible.

Is your school amongst them?

https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/10/06/more-than-640-ontario-schools-and-daycares-fail-lead-tests-in-the-past-two-years.html

Avenue Road PS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Cameron Heights CI Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Centennial PS Waterloo Region District School Board 16.70%
Clemens Mill PS Waterloo Region District School Board 16.70%
Courtland Senior PS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Galt C & VI Waterloo Region District School Board 66.70%
Glencairn PS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Glenview Park SS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Hespeler PS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Howard Robertson PS Waterloo Region District School Board 100.00%
John Darling PS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
King Edward PS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Kitchener Waterloo C & Vs Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Lincoln Heights PS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Margaret Avenue PS Waterloo Region District School Board 33.30%
New Dundee PS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Park Manor Sr PS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Preston HS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Queen Elizabeth PS Waterloo Region District School Board 33.30%
Queensmount Sr PS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Sandowne PS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Smithson PS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Southwood SS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Sunnyside Sr PS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Waterloo CI Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%
Wm G Davis Sr PS Waterloo Region District School Board 50.00%

Financial Literacy (wants vs needs) & Canadian History (fur trade)

http://talkwithourkidsaboutmoney.com/resources/the-difference-between-needs-and-wants/#

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN NEEDS AND WANTS

BRIEF OVERVIEW OF THE LESSON:

The students will discuss the differences between needs and wants in the context of early fur trade between First Nations and Europe.

wantsneedsfurtrade

LINK TO ONTARIO HISTORY CURRICULUM:
  • Compare and contrast past and present attitudes to the fur industry such as ideas about trapping, fashion etc.
  • Identify and explain examples of conflict and cooperation between the French and First Nation peoples.