#WelcomeRefugees

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/refugees/welcome/index.asp

Help refugees: Volunteer and donate

Many refugees will need extra help getting settled in Canada. Supportive social networks and service provider organizations are essential to the integration of newcomers, including refugees.

Through these networks and organizations, refugees can get information, find housing and jobs, improve their language skills, become civically involved, gain critical cultural knowledge and receive emotional and other support.

We encourage individuals, communities and businesses to welcome refugees and help them integrate into the communities.

Volunteer in your community

Consider volunteering with an organization that works with newcomers in your area.

Search our interactive map for federally funded organizations that may be in need of resources, visit Volunteer Canada’s website for ideas or seek out volunteer opportunities in your community.

Donate to help in Canada

New refugees have immediate needs, including furniture, clothing, food, dishes and much more as they resettle in Canada. Canadians can help by donating money to local organizations such as Sponsorship Agreement Holders (SAHs) that help support newcomers in Canada.

If you want to find out if an organization is a registered Canadian charity that can issue tax receipts, check the charities listings.

Local donations can go a long way. Not sure where to start?

In British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Nunavut, you can visit 211.ca or call 211 toll-free to find out how you can offer support for refugees. 211 is Canada’s primary source of information on government and community-based health and social services.

Consider donating through the

A few more ways you can contribute

Find out where the refugees are going

Learn which communities and service provider organizations across Canada are welcoming refugees.

Sponsor Syrian refugees

There are a few ways to sponsor refugees. Find out which way works best for you.

From Damascus to Toronto: Mohamed

Facing forced enrolment in the Syrian army, for a war he did not want to join, Mohamed fled to Lebanon, where his dreams of Canada took root.

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Mensa for Kids – I need a Super Hero Unit

http://www.mensaforkids.org/teach/lesson-plans/i-need-a-superhero/

I Need a Superhero

Download the PDF version of this lesson plan.

Introduction

Hereos pin

The idea of the hero is something that even very small children understand at some level. Many perennially favorite picture books feature heroic characters (such as Max in Where the Wild Things Are — a retelling of Homer’s Odyssey). As children grow, their exposure to different manifestations of the hero broadens. They encounter heroes in television, movies, books, magazines and music, and on the pages of their local newspapers.

The heroic archetype features prominently in literary analysis at the high school level. A clear understanding of, and the ability to manipulate and apply, this idea is critical to any approach to world literature for the high school student. Unlike most of the Mensa Foundation’s lesson plans, this one includes the reading of a long novel as its culminating assignment.

This lesson plan was designed to tie into the Mensa Hero Bracket Challenge that began in the October 2010 issue of the Mensa Bulletin, with the results announced in the March 2011 issue. It is not necessary to read the article, however, for students to benefit from the lesson plan. If you are a member of Mensa, you (or your students) may read about the Hero Bracket Challenge in the October 2010 issue.

Guiding Questions

  • What makes a hero?
  • Where do we find heroes?
  • How are heroes in books different from heroes in real life?
  • What is the journey of the hero and how does the archetype manifest itself?

Learning Objectives
After completing the lessons in this unit, students will be able to:

  • Explain what makes a hero and the elements of the heroic journey.
  • Recognize heroic figures in multiple media.
  • Analyze a literary work for the heroic archetype.
  • Analyze a piece of literature for elements of the hero and the heroic journey.
  • Write an essay comparing and contrasting heroes in two works.

Preparation

  • Ensure Internet access to look up relevant sites.
  • Get a copy of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain.
  • Print out copies of this plan as needed.

Climate Comic Contest 2017

http://cdn.worldslargestlesson.globalgoals.org/2017/09/PPT-Climate-Comic-Contest-Workshop.pdf

climate-contest

PARTICIPATE IN OUR CONTEST

WHAT

Learn more about climate change AND create a superhero with an earth-saving adventure! The world will vote on the top submissions at the UN Climate Conference, COP23.

The winner will bring their superhero to life in comic-book form worldwide on earth day! Are you ready to save the world?

WHY?

  • To show the world that young people are superheroes for climate change.
  • To become an official author of Comics Uniting Nations

WHEN

  • Submit your superhero by Oct 22, 2017

climate comic

Canadian Citizenship Week: Oct 9-15, 2017

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What does it mean to be a Canadian? Citizenship Week is here!

Citizenship Week is being celebrated across Canada from October 9 to 15, 2017. As we continue to mark Canada 150, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada wants to hear from you! Join many prominent Canadians who will be taking to social media to reflect what it means to be a Canadian and celebrate citizenship!  Share stories of your citizenship journey, photos of your citizenship ceremony or videos with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram using the hashtag #CitizenshipWeek.
Everyone is invited to show their pride during Citizenship Week and attend a special citizenship ceremony in your area. Details of where ceremonies are taking place, as well as information on how to organize a reaffirmation ceremony can be found at Canada.ca/celebrate-citizenship

Teacher Resources

Teacher guides have been developed in partnership with IRCC and CBC. The guides include grade-specific (grades 1-12) classroom activities which are built around expanding knowledge and awareness of Citizenship. They are available now to download for free on  Curio.ca Curio.ca is CBC and Radio-Canada’s online subscriber-based streaming service developed expressly for the Canadian educational community.
Also, during the entire month of October,Curio.ca’s Canada 150: Immigration collection  will be freely accessible to the public. Learn how immigration is one of the central themes in Canadian history.

Online Citizenship Resources

IRCC is proud to provide tools to help your students learn about Canadian citizenship.
·Canada Day 1   explores the multifaceted experiences of newcomers, from their first day to how Canada became their home, from Confederation in 1867 to the present day.
·Francophone Immigration in Canada: a part of our history explores how, from the banks of the Atlantic to the shores of British Columbia, Francophones have had a huge impact on Canada’s history.
To learn more about what IRCC learning tools and resources are available, contact IRCC>Outreach-Rayonnement.IRCC@cic.gc.ca
This message is being sent from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada as a resource for educators.

Toronto Star: Classroom Connection – What does social justice mean to you?

Teachers, if you are looking for an authentic purpose and audience for student writing, media or art, you may be interested in what the Toronto Star is launching below.  They will be releasing newspaper sets (similar to what they released on the wars at Remembrance Day, and what we received at networking) in the spring.

Classroom Connection: What Does Social Justice Mean to You? 

TEACHERS: This spring, we will be launching a new Social Justice activity workbook for schools in Canada.

We want YOUR students to help DESIGN the front cover
by answering the question:
What does social justice mean to you?

Schools play an important role in setting the tone for the ways people live in the broader community; and therefore are at the heart of social change.

Terms of entry

  • Submission must be made by a certified Canadian teacher
  • By submitting your entries you agree to allow Toronto Star Newspapers Limited to include your submission to form a word cloud, which will be used to create the front cover for our social justice resource to schools. There will be no compensation made for participating in this project. If space permits, the resource may list all the names of the schools that participated in forming the word cloud.

Valentine’s for Veterans

Dear educator,

It may be wintertime but did you know you can help bring a little extra warmth to some very deserving people on Valentine’s Day? Each year grateful Canadians create thousands of handmade valentines for Veterans who live in long-term care facilities. Reaching out with a heartfelt message of thanks is a wonderful way for youth to remember the brave men and women who have served in uniform over the years. Learn about our popular ‘Valentines for Vets’ initiative today!  www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance/get-involved/valentines-for-veterans

Veterans Affairs Canada offers a wealth of free, bilingual resources that can be used to help young people learn more about the courageous Canadians who have served our country in the cause of peace and freedom from the 19th century to today. Explore the ‘Educators’ section of our web site and see what we have for yourself. www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance/information-for/educators

Roses are Red, Violets are Blue…
Valentine’s Day is a great time, for Veterans to hear from you!

If you would like to send a valentine containing a personal message of appreciation to a Veteran, please send it by February 1 to:

Valentines for Vets
Veterans Affairs Canada
Commemoration
P.O. Box 7700
Charlottetown, PE C1A 8M9

All Other Enquiries:
information@vac-acc.gc.ca

 

GapMinder Geography Tools for Teachers

http://www.gapminder.org/for-teachers/

For Teachers

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