Bowling on a curve: A classroom analogy

A bowling metaphor for the classroom.ūüé≥

We often bowl down the middle leaving the pins standing at either side of the lane (leaving students needing the most support & most challenge standing).

We need to change our aim. ūüéĮ

Find out how here:

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SpeakUp Project Grants for Students in Grades 7-12

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/students/speakup/index.html

2017-18 SpeakUp Project Grant applications are open!
Students in grades 7-12!
Apply by Thursday, December 7, 2017 ‚Äď before midnight, EST.

What is it?

Student Voice aims to promote student engagement and success in Ontario’s schools by listening to and learning from students. Student Voice provides you, the students, with a variety of ways to share your ideas with your school, the education community and the ministry about what would help support your engagement in your¬†learning. Student Voice can help you take action to shape your learning environment while you build your skills.

We want all students to be successful, and we need your ideas and actions to make this happen.

Check out¬†this video¬†to get an idea of what’s changing for Ontario students!

It all starts with you

Speak up! You have a voice, and we want to hear what you have to say about your education. Your ideas and actions are key in helping Ontario’s publicly funded education system reach the goals set out in its¬†Achieving Excellencevision for education. We want to help you make your school a place where everyone feels welcome and where you are empowered to speak your mind, get involved and become active citizens and leaders.

Students told us that you want to:

  • share your ideas with government on how to strengthen student engagement and make Ontario’s publicly funded education system even better.
  • have a school culture where all students feel and know that they belong.
  • work as partners with your teachers, and participate in school decisions that will shape your lives and the lives of other students.

How can you get involved?

There are four main ways for you to get involved:

  1. Minister’s Student Advisory Council (MSAC)
    Each year, approximately 60 students in grades 7 to 12 from across the province are selected to form the council. MSAC provides advice on ministry policies and programs and also meets with the Minister of Education to share their ideas and perspectives.Find out more about the council.
  2. Students as Researchers (StaR)
    Students as Researchers training provides training for student-teacher teams from grade 7-12 in collaborative inquiry research. StaR teams are taught the fundamental components of social science research (e.g. ethics, research design and methodologies, data analysis, etc.).Students work together to identify and research an issue impacting the student experience (e.g. equity, student engagement, well-being or achievement, etc.). For example, teams could conduct research on questions such as: “What experiences engage students in math class?” or “What conditions help students
    learn?”

    Talk to your school principal if you are interested in participating.

    Check out what we’re doing to¬†give students a voice.

  3. SpeakUp Projects
    SpeakUp Projects grants can help you, the students, get your voices heard and take action by leading projects that make a difference in your school. To date, thousands of students in grades 7-12 have actively led or participated in more than 10,000 projects in hundreds of schools across Ontario.Learn how you can start putting your ideas into action.
  4. SpeakUp in a Box
    SpeakUp in a Box¬†is a “do-it-yourself” forum kit which contains everything you will need to run a student-led forum for 30 participants at your school. It includes facilitator tip sheets, a step-by-step forum guide and forum supplies. During the forum your peers share ideas about what can help students be more engaged in learning and school life.Watch a video about¬†SpeakUp¬†in a Box.

    Learn more and order your kit today!

This is your education. Speak up and get involved! Let’s all work together to ensure Ontario’s publicly funded education system remains among the best in the¬†world.

Send your comments and ideas to studentvoice@ontario.ca.

See what students like you are saying and doing on Facebook to raise the student voice. Share your student engagement thoughts and activities by liking SpeakUp Ontario on Facebook and posting there.

 

Math – The Fractal Foundation Educator’s Guide

The Fractal Foundation

A fractal is a never-ending pattern. Fractals are infinitely complex patterns that are self-similar across different scales. They are created by repeating a simple process over and over in an ongoing feedback loop. Driven by recursion, fractals are images of dynamic systems ‚Äď the pictures of Chaos. Geometrically, they exist in between our familiar dimensions. Fractal patterns are extremely familiar, since nature is full of fractals. For instance: trees, rivers, coastlines, mountains, clouds, seashells, hurricanes, etc. Abstract fractals ‚Äď such as the Mandelbrot Set ‚Äď can be generated by a computer calculating a simple equation over and over.

For a simple description of fractals, please download our¬†‚ÄúOne Pager‚Ä̬†(380Kb).

For more detailed info, please download our 20 page¬†‚ÄúEducators‚Äô Guide‚Ä̬†(7.5Mb).

Fractal Triangle ‚Äď Fractal Foundation

Canadian Legion Remembrance Day Contest

Youth Remembrance Contests

canadian-legion-remembrance-contest

Fostering Remembrance is a part of everything we do. Through The Royal Canadian Legion’s longstanding Annual Poster and Literary Contests, Canadian school children honour Canada‚Äôs Veterans through creative art and writing, and help perpetuate Remembrance.

 

ContestWinners2017

 

Poster and Literary Contests

The contests are divided into four categories:

 

  • Senior: Grades 10, 11, 12
  • Intermediate: Grades 7, 8, 9
  • Junior: Grades 4, 5, 6
  • Primary: Grades 1, 2, 3 (Poster Contest only)

The Poster Contest is divided into two categories: colour and black and white. The Literary Contest is divided into two categories: essay and poem. Entries are submitted at the Branch level and winning entries proceed to the provincial and then national level.

Prizes

 

The winning entries for each category at the national level are displayed at the Canadian War Museum from July 1 to May 1 of the following year. For the Poster Contest, the second place winners, and those receiving an honourable mention, are displayed in the foyer of the House of Commons during the Remembrance period in November.

For the senior winners in the four contests (two posters, one essay and one poetry), the Legion sponsors a trip to Ottawa to attend the National Remembrance Day Service. There, the winners place a wreath on behalf of the youth of Canada as well as have an opportunity to meet and visit with the Governor General.

 

Entering and regulations

Students can enter as many contests as they wish, but can submit only one entry per category.

Local Legion Branches determine the Poster and Literary Contests deadlines for entries. To participate, schools should contact their local Legion in September for information. Contact your local Branch for details.

Download the Youth Education brochure

Download the application form

 

Judging

Initial judging takes place at the community level by volunteers at local Legion Branches. The winning entries are then judged at the provincial level. The winners at this level are sent to Ottawa where the national winners are declared. The winnin

 

g entries are published in the Winners Booklet which is sent to all Branches and available to schools.

Download the Judging Guidelines

Past winners

2017 | 2016 | 2015 |2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

The Legion encourages schools to contact their local Legion Branch for details on coordinating the Poster and Literary Contests.

The First Page Writing Challenge by CBC

the-first-pageThe First Page is a brand new creative writing challenge for students in Grades 7 to 12, created by CBC Books. What’s the challenge? CBC Books wants students to write the first page of an original book set 150 years in the future. Watch these five Canadian authors who give their tips on writing a great first page.

Download the First Page teacher guide for key concepts to crafting a compelling opening, possible writing topics and discussion questions.

To enter the challenge, visit: cbc.ca/thefirstpage

Mathigon – Textbooks come to life

mathigon-for-teachersMathigon contains¬†amazing content¬†for the entire mathematics curriculum. Simply pick a chapter and tell your students to work through it ‚Äď as a homework assignment, or on within a flipped classroom setting. A teacher dashboard shows¬†detailed analytics¬†on their progress and mastery.

Mathigon works on tablets and laptops, and every student will automatically get a highly interactive and personalised experience. Our content is aligned to mathigonthe Common Core (US) and other national curricula.

Every chapter comes with a corresponding lesson plan for teachers, and we have a library of all the interactive games and components to use.

 

About Mathigon

Everything in our world follows mathematical laws: from the motion of stars and galaxies to the transmission of phone signals, bus timetables,

 

weather prediction and online banking. Mathematics lets us describe and explain all of these examples, and can reveal profound truths about their underlying patterns.

Unfortunately the school curriculum often fails to convey the incredible power and great beauty of mathematics. In most cases, school mathematics is simply about memorising abstract concepts: a teacher (or a video, or a mobile app) explains how to solve a specific kind of problem, students have to remember it, and then us

e it to solve homework or exam questions. This has changed very little during the last century, and is one of the reasons why so many students dislike mathematics.

‚ÄúIt is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education.‚ÄĚ

‚Äď Albert Einstein

In fact, the process of studying mathematics is often much more important than the actual content: it teaches problem solving, logical reasoning, generalising and abstra

ction. Mathematics should be about¬†creativity, curiosity, surprise and imagination¬†‚Äď not memorising and rote learning.

Mathigon is part interactive textbook and part virtual personal tutor. Using cutting-edge technology and an innovative new curriculum, we want to make learning mathematics more active, personalised and fun.

Active Learning

Rather than telling students how to solve new kinds of problems, we want them to be able to¬†explore and ‚Äúdiscover‚Ä̬†solutions on their own. Our content is split into many small sections, and students have to¬†actively participate¬†at every step before the next one is revealed: by solving problems, exploring simulations, finding patterns and drawing conclusions.

We built many new types of interactive components, which go far beyond simple multiple choice questions or textboxes. Students can draw paths across bridges in Königsberg, run large probability simulations, investigate which shapes can be used to create tessellations, and much more.

Personalisation

As users interact with Mathigon, we can slowly build up an internal model of how well they know different related concepts in mathematics: the¬†knowledge graph. This data can then be used to¬†adapt and personalisethe content ‚Äď we can predict where students might struggle because they haven‚Äôt mastered all the prerequisites, or switch between different explanations based on students‚Äô preferred learning style.

A virtual personal tutor guides you step-by-step through explanations and gives tailored hints or encouragement in a conversational interface. Students can even ask their own questions.

Storytelling

Using Mathigon requires much more effort and concentration from students, compared to simply watching a video or listening to a teacher. That’s why it is important make the content has fun and engaging as possible.

Mathigon is filled with colourful illustrations, and every chapter has a captivating narrative. Rather than teaching mathematics as a collection of abstract facts and exercises, we use real life applications, puzzles, historic context, inter-disciplinary connections, or even fictional stories to make the content come alive. This gives students a clear reason why what they learn is useful, and makes the content itself much more memorable.

All these goals are difficult to achieve in a classroom, because a single teacher simply can’t offer the individual support required by every student. Of course, we don’t want to replace schools or teachers. Mathigon should be used as a supplement: by students who are struggling and need additional help, students who want to go beyond what they learn at school, or even by teachers in a blended learning environment.