Mathigon – Textbooks come to life

mathigon-for-teachersMathigon contains amazing content for the entire mathematics curriculum. Simply pick a chapter and tell your students to work through it – as a homework assignment, or on within a flipped classroom setting. A teacher dashboard shows detailed analytics on their progress and mastery.

Mathigon works on tablets and laptops, and every student will automatically get a highly interactive and personalised experience. Our content is aligned to mathigonthe Common Core (US) and other national curricula.

Every chapter comes with a corresponding lesson plan for teachers, and we have a library of all the interactive games and components to use.

 

About Mathigon

Everything in our world follows mathematical laws: from the motion of stars and galaxies to the transmission of phone signals, bus timetables,

 

weather prediction and online banking. Mathematics lets us describe and explain all of these examples, and can reveal profound truths about their underlying patterns.

Unfortunately the school curriculum often fails to convey the incredible power and great beauty of mathematics. In most cases, school mathematics is simply about memorising abstract concepts: a teacher (or a video, or a mobile app) explains how to solve a specific kind of problem, students have to remember it, and then us

e it to solve homework or exam questions. This has changed very little during the last century, and is one of the reasons why so many students dislike mathematics.

“It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education.”

– Albert Einstein

In fact, the process of studying mathematics is often much more important than the actual content: it teaches problem solving, logical reasoning, generalising and abstra

ction. Mathematics should be about creativity, curiosity, surprise and imagination – not memorising and rote learning.

Mathigon is part interactive textbook and part virtual personal tutor. Using cutting-edge technology and an innovative new curriculum, we want to make learning mathematics more active, personalised and fun.

Active Learning

Rather than telling students how to solve new kinds of problems, we want them to be able to explore and “discover” solutions on their own. Our content is split into many small sections, and students have to actively participate at every step before the next one is revealed: by solving problems, exploring simulations, finding patterns and drawing conclusions.

We built many new types of interactive components, which go far beyond simple multiple choice questions or textboxes. Students can draw paths across bridges in Königsberg, run large probability simulations, investigate which shapes can be used to create tessellations, and much more.

Personalisation

As users interact with Mathigon, we can slowly build up an internal model of how well they know different related concepts in mathematics: the knowledge graph. This data can then be used to adapt and personalisethe content – we can predict where students might struggle because they haven’t mastered all the prerequisites, or switch between different explanations based on students’ preferred learning style.

virtual personal tutor guides you step-by-step through explanations and gives tailored hints or encouragement in a conversational interface. Students can even ask their own questions.

Storytelling

Using Mathigon requires much more effort and concentration from students, compared to simply watching a video or listening to a teacher. That’s why it is important make the content has fun and engaging as possible.

Mathigon is filled with colourful illustrations, and every chapter has a captivating narrative. Rather than teaching mathematics as a collection of abstract facts and exercises, we use real life applications, puzzles, historic context, inter-disciplinary connections, or even fictional stories to make the content come alive. This gives students a clear reason why what they learn is useful, and makes the content itself much more memorable.

All these goals are difficult to achieve in a classroom, because a single teacher simply can’t offer the individual support required by every student. Of course, we don’t want to replace schools or teachers. Mathigon should be used as a supplement: by students who are struggling and need additional help, students who want to go beyond what they learn at school, or even by teachers in a blended learning environment.

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Contest: Your Solution to Plastic Pollution

https://environmentaldefence.ca/2017/10/05/national-competition-invites-canadian-youth-share-local-plastic-pollution-solutions/

Hey, students (& Teachers)!

(Teachers – we also have free resources to help you incorporate YRE into your lesson plans this year.)

The world has a big plastic pollution problem on its hands. And there’s a creative way for you to be part of the solution.

Environmental Defence’s Young Reporters for the Environment (YRE) Canada program has just launched its annual eco-journalism competition for youth. The theme for this year’s competition is: Your Solution to Plastic Pollution.

Promo image for Environmental Defence's national eco-journalism competition for youth

For the competition, Canadian youth (ages 11-14 and 15-18) are invited to investigate solutions to plastic pollution in their communities, and share what they found through photography, videography, or writing. The deadline for this year’s competition is March 30, 2018.

Winners will be published by Alternatives Journal magazine. First place winners in each category will go on to compete in the International Young Reporters for the Environment Competition, run by the Foundation for Environmental Education (FEE).

Plastic pollution is getting out of control

Plastic pollution on a beach
Photo credit: Cristina Bergman

 

Plastic pollution is one of the fastest growing problems on the planet. Here’s a quick look at how big this problem really is:

The good news is that there are solutions. So, grab a camera and/or your notebook, and head out into your community and start exploring.

Tips to help you get started

Not sure of how to get started with your story? We can help! We have lots of great free resources on our website to help you craft your plastic pollution stories, including handbooks and instructional videos.

Visit youngreporters.ca to learn more. And good luck!

P.S. Teachers – we also have free resources to help you incorporate YRE into your lesson plans this year.

The Museum – Maker Space Challenges

http://www.themuseum.ca/experience/underground-studio/education/

Students will learn by doing through experimentation, exploration and by ‘failing’ forward in unique 75 minute workshops delivered in our one-of-a-kind MakerSpace. Take part in projects across one of seven core program streams: 3D Modeling, Computer Programming, Circuitry & Soldering, Woodworking, Screenprinting, Textiles, or Deconstruction. Each program is linked to Ontario Curriculum expectations with an emphasis on inquiry-based learning and developing critical thinking skills.

It All Starts Here.

AGAINST THE GRAIN – WOODWORKING

Through proper use of hand and power tools for woodworking, students will cut, drill and fasten materials to measured specifications for the design of a tool box.

CONDUCTION JUNCTION – CIRCUITRY AND SOLDERING

Students will create digital circuits that carry out a specific task while considering electrical principles such as voltage, current and resistance. Students will complete the workshop by soldering a circuit together as a take home badge.

DESTINATION DISASSEMBLY – DECONSTRUCTION

Students will learn about the engineering design process to consider a simple challenge by deconstructing found objects using tools and methods provided. They will then be tasked with assembling a unique object that fulfills an imagined function.

HELLO, MR. ROBOT – COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (1-6)

Introduce your students to computer programming in a visual environment using the Scratch platform. Interpret how different logical statements change how a system behaves and experiment with different sensory commands to see what programs are capable of doing.

HELLO, MR. ROBOT – COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (7-12)

Challenge your students to create a program using the Arduino platform that causes lights to blink. Students will learn about the relationship between hardware and software by wiring systems together. Finally, students will decode a message in ASCII with the help from our robot Nali!

PLOT, BLOT, AND TWO STITCHING STYLES – SCREEN PRINTING AND TEXTILES

Using traditional screen printing methods, students will create and cut a custom design from heat transfer vinyl and transfer their design onto fabric.

 

The Museum – Theme Weeks

S.T.E.M: DESTINATION IMAGINATION

November 6 – November 10, 2017
Challenge your students to a day of interactive S.T.E.M activities and workshops. Make, tinker, build, and connect with professionals from Waterloo Region’s tech sector to showcase the potential of pursuing S.T.E.M based careers!

It all starts here.

ABORIGINAL INTERSECTIONS – Social Studies

March 26 – March 29, 2018
Stories unite us. They come from traditions of the wampum weavers and oral storytellers sharing tales of Turtle Island. But they are also being explored by emerging Aboriginal artists. Students have a unique opportunity to learn about storytelling, traditions, and the rich culture of Canadian First Nations communities.

MEDIEVAL WEEK – Grade 4 Social Studies

April 30 – May 3, 2018
Hear ye! Hear ye! Students will be immersed in unique hands-on medieval activities and workshops as we travel back to medieval times. Students will participate in a variety of workshops to experience the challenges, intrigue and excitement of living during Medieval times – all led by in-character facilitators!

 

The Museum -Education Programs

http://www.themuseum.ca/experience/educators/education-programs/

ALONG THE LINES OF COLOUR

Unleash your inner artist and explore the world of colour! Investigate how artists use colour, texture, shape, and line to suggest different ideas, feelings, and messages through their art. Learn how to dot, dash, and swirl like the masters and then use your imagination to complete a colour-filled art challenge.

DISCOVER SPACE

Explore the night sky and blast off into outer space in our Star Lab planetarium. Discover planets, moons, stars, and satellites while uncovering the relationship between humans and our solar system. End the visit by launching your very own rocket in our atrium!

KIC – ENERGY IN OUR LIVES

Investigate solar power and energy conservation through a series of hands-on activities and learn the importance of our sun.

KIM – A HEALTHY START

Meet KiM, our Kids in Motion mascot, and learn about different parts of the body in this interactive program. Move and groove to get your hearts pumping before learning about healthy foods while enjoying a fruit smoothie.

LITTLEBITS

Harness the power of electricity! Explore the different types of circuits through hands on activities. Then use our littleBits library to see how electricity travels and brings things to life through light, sound or motion.

MISSION POSSIBLE

THEMUSEUM needs your help! Use teamwork and inquiry skills to solve mysteries throughout THEMUSEUM to figure out ‘who did it’!

SCIENCE WITHIN

Discover the respiratory, circulatory, and digestive systems in your body in this highly interactive program. Create working models of each system and take a look at a real pig lung!

STARLAB PRESENTATIONS

Take your class on an out-of-this-world trip in our planetarium. Understand planets, moons, stars, and satellites, travel through space, and uncover mysteries of our solar system.

STILL STANDING

Calling all builders! Learn about the impact natural disasters have on our buildings and structures by taking on the challenge of creating structures strong enough to withstand the effects of different disasters. See which ones will stay standing and which ones will come crumbling down.

SURVIVING NATURE UNLEASHED

Explore the impact of Mother Nature on our planet and society. Students will play THEMUSEUM’s original board game Disaster Strikes! to understand how communities around the world cope with the devastation caused by natural disasters. Find out if your city can survive Nature Unleashed!

THE POWER OF LIGHT

Do-gooders unite! Explore the powers of light in our super heroes in training program. Learn how to harness the properties of light to create your own superhero gadgets.

Veterans Affairs Canada Remembrance Day Resources

Veterans’ Week Learning Resources These materials are free of charge. To receive your order by Veterans’ Week, please order before October 27, 2017.


This year marks the centennial of the First World War’s Battle of Passchendaele. Explore our web feature for historical info, photo galleries, commemorative events & 4 new lesson plans (one for every age group)

Mensa for Kids – I need a Super Hero Unit

http://www.mensaforkids.org/teach/lesson-plans/i-need-a-superhero/

I Need a Superhero

Download the PDF version of this lesson plan.

Introduction

Hereos pin

The idea of the hero is something that even very small children understand at some level. Many perennially favorite picture books feature heroic characters (such as Max in Where the Wild Things Are — a retelling of Homer’s Odyssey). As children grow, their exposure to different manifestations of the hero broadens. They encounter heroes in television, movies, books, magazines and music, and on the pages of their local newspapers.

The heroic archetype features prominently in literary analysis at the high school level. A clear understanding of, and the ability to manipulate and apply, this idea is critical to any approach to world literature for the high school student. Unlike most of the Mensa Foundation’s lesson plans, this one includes the reading of a long novel as its culminating assignment.

This lesson plan was designed to tie into the Mensa Hero Bracket Challenge that began in the October 2010 issue of the Mensa Bulletin, with the results announced in the March 2011 issue. It is not necessary to read the article, however, for students to benefit from the lesson plan. If you are a member of Mensa, you (or your students) may read about the Hero Bracket Challenge in the October 2010 issue.

Guiding Questions

  • What makes a hero?
  • Where do we find heroes?
  • How are heroes in books different from heroes in real life?
  • What is the journey of the hero and how does the archetype manifest itself?

Learning Objectives
After completing the lessons in this unit, students will be able to:

  • Explain what makes a hero and the elements of the heroic journey.
  • Recognize heroic figures in multiple media.
  • Analyze a literary work for the heroic archetype.
  • Analyze a piece of literature for elements of the hero and the heroic journey.
  • Write an essay comparing and contrasting heroes in two works.

Preparation

  • Ensure Internet access to look up relevant sites.
  • Get a copy of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain.
  • Print out copies of this plan as needed.